The Divine Office in the Latin Middle Ages
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The Divine Office in the Latin Middle Ages methodology and source studies, regional developments, hagiography : written in honor of Professor Ruth Steiner by

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Published by Oxford University Press in New York .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Church music -- Catholic Church -- 500-1400,
  • Divine office,
  • Divine office (Music) -- History and criticism

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementedited by Margot E. Fassler and Rebecca A. Baltzer
ContributionsSteiner, Ruth, Fassler, Margot Elsbeth, Baltzer, Rebecca A. 1940-
Classifications
LC ClassificationsML3080 .D58 2000
The Physical Object
Paginationxxiv, 632 p. :
Number of Pages632
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL16985441M
ISBN 100195124537
LC Control Number99019507

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The Divine Office--the cycle of daily worship other than the Mass--is the richest source of liturgical texts and music from the Latin Middle Ages. However, its richness, the great diversity of its manuscripts, and its many variations from community to community have made it difficult to study, and it remains largely unexplored terrain. This volume is a practical guide to the Divine Office for.   The Divine Office—the cycle of daily worship other than the Mass—is the richest source of liturgical texts and music from the Latin Middle Ages. However, its richness, the great diversity of its manuscripts, and its many variations from community to community have made it difficult to study, and it remains largely unexplored : Margot E. Fassler. The Divine Office, or the cycle of daily worship services other than the Mass, constitutes the most important body of liturgical texts and music for medieval studies. It is a collection of spiritual works that is central to the culture of the Middle Ages. This book addresses the Office from a variety of points of view. The Divine Office, or the cycle of daily worship services other than the Mass, constitutes the most important body of liturgical texts and music for medieval studies. It is a collection of spiritual works that is central to the culture of the Middle Ages.

Read the full-text online edition of The Divine Office in the Latin Middle Ages: Methodology and Source Studies, Regional Developments, Hagiography (). Home» Browse» Books» Book details, The Divine Office in the Latin Middle Ages. The Divine Office in the Latin Middle Ages: methodology and source studies, regional developments, hagiography: written in honor of Professor Ruth Steiner. [Ruth Steiner; Margot Elsbeth Fassler; Rebecca A Baltzer;] -- "This volume is a practical guide to the Divine Office for students and scholars throughout the field of medieval studies. The Liturgy of the Hours (Latin: Liturgia Horarum) or Divine Office (Latin: Officium Divinum) or Work of God (Latin: Opus Dei) or canonical hours, often referred to as the Breviary, is the official set of prayers "marking the hours of each day and sanctifying the day with prayer". It consists primarily of psalms supplemented by hymns, readings and other prayers and antiphons. The book surveys the many questions related to the Office and presents the leading analytical tools and research methods now used in the field.\" \"The Divine Office in the Latin Middle Ages is an essential resource for anyone studying medieval liturgy.

The Divine Office--the cycle of daily worship other than the Mass--is the richest source of liturgical texts and music from the Latin Middle Ages. However, its richness, the great diversity of its manuscripts, and its many variations from community to community have made it difficult to study, and it remains largely unexplored cturer: Oxford University Press. A breviary unites all the chants and texts needed for the celebration of the Divine combines the separate books that contained prayers (the collectar), Matins lessons (the office lectionary), chants (antiphonal and choir psalter), and ordinary chants and readings (the diurnal).The individual texts may be indicated only by their incipit. Terce, or Third Hour, is a fixed time of prayer of the Divine Office in almost all the Christian liturgies. It consists mainly of psalms and is said at 9 a.m. Its name comes from Latin and refers to the third hour of the day after dawn. 4 Armenian Liturgy. 5 Eastern Christian Office. The origin of Terce, like that of Sext and None, to which it. THE DIVINE OFFICE IN THE LATIN MIDDLE AGES. Prelude; I A METHODOLOGICAL INTRODUCTION. I Sermons, Sacramentaries, and Early Sources for the Office in the Latin West; 2 Reading an Office Book; II THE PRE‐CAROLINGIAN OFFICE. 3 The Origins of the Western Office; 4 Observations on the Divine Office in the Rule of the Master.